Canine Cancer Symptoms – The A – Z Of Dog Cancer Treatment & Prevention

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Canine Cancer Symptoms – The A – Z Of Dog Cancer Treatment & Prevention

Are you concerned about canine cancer symptoms and want to know about the facts?

Perhaps you have a new puppy or your dog has been in your family for a long time. Whatever the age of your dog it is very important you know about the different forms of canine cancer.

You may not know it, but one in two dogs is likely to develop some form of cancer during their lifetime.

Dogs are two times more likely to develop leukaemia than humans. Four times more chances to suffer from breast cancer and eight times more at risk to bone cancer than us. And, they are 35 more times at risk of developing skin cancer than we are.

It’s true. Dogs have a much greater chance of developing some form of cancer than humans and the signs of canine cancer symptoms are much less obvious.

Now you can now see why cancer is the leading cause of non accidental deaths in dogs. There are currently over 35 million dogs in the United States either living with cancer or at great risk of developing cancer in their lives.

But the good news is if you know what to look for, how to identify canine cancer symptoms, what treatments are available and what the best forms of therapy and preventions are, you and your pet have little to worry about.

It is possible to triple your dog’s chances of survival. Knowledge and understanding is the key!

First you need to be aware of the different forms of dog cancer.

Skin cancer in dogs comes in four categories: Cysts, Papilloma, Lipoma & Hematoma

Epidermal Inclusion Cyst, also known as sebaceous cysts. These are common and are found all over the body. Poodles, Miniature Schnauzers, Spaniels and Terriers are the breeds most often affected. They are a dome like growth, up to an inch and a half in size, usually smaller and black in color.

Skin Papilloma’s on dogs are wart like growths, usually benign and will occur on the body, on the foot pads, and underneath the nails.

Lipoma in dogs is a benign fatty lump usually found just under the skin and can appear anywhere on the body but most likely in the belly/chest region and upper leg. They are very common in older dogs (8 years plus) and more often in bitches that are overweight. Certain dog breeds may be more at risk, but not limited to: Miniature Schnauzers, Doberman Pinschers, Labradors and mixed breeds.

A hematoma is a blood clot beneath the skin, caused by a blow or contusion. These are not technically a skin cancer. But can have similar canine cancer symptoms and if not treated can lead to cancer.

Calcifying hematoma is a hard mass similar to bone often found near an old fracture site, or may occur as a lump on the head. Because, they have the potential to turn into a canine bone cancer, calcifying hematomas should to be biopsied and possibly removed. Unlike skin cancer in dogs they are difficult to treat and often reoccur.

Other common forms of canine cancer are:

* Neoplasia In Dogs

* Dog Bone Cancer

* Mast Cell Tumors

* Lymphatic Cancer

* Canine Osteosarcoma

These can all manifest in many different forms E.g. Bladder cancer, Throat cancer, Spleen cancer, Thyroid Cancer, Eye cancer. Toe cancer, Lung cancer to name but a few. Some of these are quite common, others are very rare. But the good news is; not all dogs will develop cancer.

Please do not panic having read this

As a caring dog owner it is just something you should be very aware of and more importantly know where to find information about canine cancer symptoms, preventions and treatments.

A good place to learn more about caine cancer symptoms is http://www.cancertreatmentfordogs.com This publication has a heap of information on everything relating to cancer treatments for dogs.